Fashion E-Commerce | How are your clients changing their shopping habits in the downturn?

 

LONDON, United Kingdom London, of course, is widely known in the fashion world for its unbridled creativity and superb emerging fashion talent. But, increasingly, it could also be described as fashion’s Silicon Valley, with a growing number of innovative fashion ecommerce startups sprouting in the city, following in the footsteps of the ultimate luxury e-tailing pioneer, Net-a-Porter.com.

During my visit to Vienna for the 9 Festival for Fashion & Photography, I had the privilege of hosting a discussion amongst some of the newest fashion e-tailers on the London scene, bringing together Sarah Curran, CEO of my-wardrobe.com, José Neves, CEO of farfetch.com and Stephanie Phair, Director of theoutnet.com.

Thanks to our easy-to-use Flip Video Mino, we managed to capture some of the most poignant responses from our illustrious panel and are pleased to share them with you in the coming weeks. First up: How are your clients changing their shopping habits in the downturn?

RSS and email subscribers, click here to watch the video.

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6 comments

  1. Unfortunately the video doesn’t seem to work.

    Big up on Farfetch.com and My-wardrobe.com (though the latter could’ve created a more original name), the sites are clean, easy to use, with great photos. My critique is that they are too similar to Net-a-porter, right down to the monochromatic look, an imitation that washes out any sort of personal identity to the new e-tailer.

    If new e-tailers are trying to make room for themselves as a hot spot to shop, they might want to focus a bit on branding. If more new sites are sprouting the same look, then there’s not much going for them to distance themselves from the pack, on top of the fact that they offer nearly the same products. Nowadays, I find online editorials to be passee, already, what else have they got?

    I think retailers like Dover Street Market in London, which focuses on avant-garde fashion, would make a nice addition to online retailing, offering one-of-a-kind products, along with some well-known designers like Ann Demeulemeester, Rodarte and Comme des Garcons, where the monochromatic look would actually fit the store’s branding style.

    Now that online shopping has been properly established, I think it’s time for e-tailers to be creative and wow us.

    Dahlia from Montreal, QC, Canada
  2. @Dahlia: Thanks for your comment. We’re working on getting the video up again and are really not sure why YouTube pulled it down.

    Imran Amed, Editor from Wezemaal, 02, Belgium (post author)
  3. Dahila, I’ve just discovered a cool website that sells one off pieces! Atelier-Mayer.com has some gorgeous vintage designer pieces. I’ve just brought a fab pendant thats very avant-garde! Check it out.

    Carolina from United Kingdom
  4. I’m starting to seriously grow tired of what I would coin, ‘mimic journalism’, which essentially highlights a specific episode (in this case credit in fashion) & then blows it so far out of proportion it actually catalyses a reaction. Firstly, the majority of consumers purchasing luxury don’t purchase on credit, they already have disposable income. Those who do purchase via credit, never equated for a huge proportion anyway and since they were buying via credit, they already looked for ‘investment pieces’ which exuded ‘quality’ (something you demand rather than expect anyhow). FarFetch aren’t buying or editing collections anyway? they’re a portal for existing physical stores? The downturn in Luxury is simply consumer knowledge, experience, intelligence and possibly a change in direction of aesthetic allure. People won’t pay through the nose for mass produced, logo embossed, extensively marked-up garments, if they’re discovering more directional, more exclusive, better quality designer elsewhere, which has become a near ease via the Internet. As for online retailers looking to pursue a more creative outlook, ‘Not Just a Label’ is perhaps on the correct path?

    moi from United Kingdom
  5. I cannot see the video either – but loving your website!!!

    Any chance you could let me know when it’s up and running again?

    Sharon from London, London, United Kingdom