Milan’s driving ambition, LVMH controls Bulgari, Magazine commerce, Who Is On Next, Tweet or be discreet?

L-R Gucci, Fendi, Etro Spring/Summer 2012 | Source: Style.com

Yelling ‘Fire’ on a Crowded Runway (NY Times)
Without question, we can count on Miuccia Prada, Raf Simons at Jil Sander, Karl Lagerfeld at Fendi and, at times, Tomas Maier of Bottega Veneta to say something with fashion, and not just offer approachable clothes. But there should be many more designers in Milan with that driving ambition. Otherwise, the future of fashion will be in jeopardy.”

LVMH says it controls 98.09 pct of Bulgari (Reuters)
LVMH , the world’s biggest luxury group, said  it controls 98.09 percent of Italy’s Bulgari after minority shareholders tendered their shares as part of its 3.7 billion euro ($5 billion) offer for the high-end jeweler. The deal will double LVMH’s watch and jewelry business to make up around 10 percent of its sales and about 6 percent of operating profit, according to analysts.”

Magazines Begin to Sell the Fashion They Review (NY Times)
“While the glossies have long had a reputation for accommodating the designers they cover, sometimes guaranteeing coverage to those who advertise in their pages, a wave of new ventures and partnerships suggests they are willing to go even further by selling the designers’ clothes.”

A Glimpse Into the Lesser Known (On the Runway)
While New York and London have built reputations for discovering new talent, making their Fashion Weeks more exciting, Milan’s fashion calendar is dominated by what you could describe as a council of village elders, leaving little room for upstarts to be noticed. That’s starting to change, season by season, with events like Who Is On Next?”

Ready To Wear: In fashion, to tweet or remain discreet? (Independent)
“How best to showcase a forthcoming collection when even the most well-heeled of Western consumers must surely be tightening her belt?… In the red corner, we have Burberry. This is a brand that upholds democracy with pride. With this in mind, the company staged what it described as the world’s first-ever ‘tweetwalk’… In the blue corner: Tom Ford… decided that he doesn’t want any pictures and/or reviews of his clothing to appear until it goes on sale at the beginning of next year.”