Cathy Horyn Resigns From The New York Times

Cathy Horyn | Photo: David Shankbone

NEW YORK, United States — Fashion critic Cathy Horyn has resigned from her post at The New York Times. An official statement confirmed the resignation this afternoon stating: “Cathy’s reasons for leaving are personal ones, to spend more [sic] with her partner, Art Ortenberg, who has had health problems, and whom she feels would benefit greatly from her increased presence at home.”

Horyn joined the newspaper in 1998 and has been in her current position since 1999, where she became one of the most influential voices in the fashion industry with her honest and tough critiques.

Horyn’s resignation comes at a time of change at The New York Times, following the exit of her former colleague Eric Wilson (who took up a position at Time Inc’s InStyle) and the recent appointments of Matthew Schneier, previously at Style.com, and John Koblin.

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9 comments

  1. As I was one of the regular, long-time commenters on the NYT blog ‘On The Runway’, it is an understatement on my part to say that she will surely be missed. She was one of the few pure, unadulterated voices of fashion criticism (a dying art form) …I wish her and her partner all the best and look forward to whatever future projects she engages in.

    Eddi Frantz from Australia
  2. As I was a regular, long-time commentator on the NY blog ‘On The Runway’, it is an understatement on my part to say that she will be missed. I wish her and her partner all the best and look forward to any future projects of hers.

    Eddi Frantz from Australia
  3. Sadly, I am not surprised. NYT has killed the unique (and wonderful) viewpoint of the IHT… will others follow?

    Jerome Mackay from London, London, United Kingdom
  4. A shame. Her voice/ POV so important in this industry, perfect example of a kind of reportage/journalism perfect at NYT but in abundant need at any monthly book
    That needs that balance. #vogue #annawintour.

    beth fazio from Baldwinville, MA, United States
  5. Wow — her honesty, candor and frank critiques of collections will be missed. She added balance and truth to her reviews. Rarely do you see anything critical of a collection in WWD or on style.com. The reviews are always filled with accolades – deserved or not. I hope they fill the position with someone equally outspoken and authentic.

    Michelle Fix from New York, NY, United States
  6. Truly shocking. She was one of the few writers whom I enjoyed her frank observations and insights, did not mill about pleasing designers in her reviews, though she did have favorites. She will be sorely missed, fashion critics in large publications such as the NY Times are a dying breed. I can only hope she will maybe contribute a few articles here and there, crossing fingers.

    Dahlia Pham from Agoura Hills, CA, United States
  7. Her mission as a critic has always been respected by a generation but I think even in journalism you can become passé as are trends in clothing etc. Everything is relative, she started in the late 90’s when the big names in design provoked thought and allure, fashion was less accessible and only available to a few, versus today with the advent of internet one can practically go through hyper pages of information regarding designers and collections and make your own conclusion. The reader becomes his own critic comparing and contrasting from one designer to another. Add to that the increasing number of fashion bloggers who in a way are the “new fashion critics” connecting directly to young consumers with a different language. Designers themselves have realized the potential in sales driven by bloggers and it will put fashion journalists out of job soon. Its a new era, we communicate differently through the eyes of these “fashion enthusiasts” and perhaps this is a much better recipe for an emerging designer fearing to be bashed by a harsh critic. I think its time for her to move on indeed she’s made a lot of enemies in the fashion ring! best of luck C.H.

    Emil Alvarez from Belize
  8. I will now have to hang up my NYT blog handle La Genevoise! I will miss reading her posts and all the comments that went along. We are losing as E.Frantz said one of the “unadulterated voices of fashion criticism”. I have a feeling we will see her again.
    Bye for now Cathy.
    -La Genevoise

    Redley Exantus from Switzerland
  9. “Add to that the increasing number of fashion bloggers who in a way are the “new fashion critics” connecting directly to young consumers with a different language. Designers themselves have realized the potential in sales driven by bloggers and it will put fashion journalists out of job soon. Its a new era, we communicate differently through the eyes of these “fashion enthusiasts” and perhaps this is a much better recipe for an emerging designer fearing to be bashed by a harsh critic.'” I agree, that’s the way it all seems to be heading. Problem with that one big love-fest is that nothing ever progresses. It just hops along from one ‘cool’ bag to one ‘cute’ shoe. There ARE of course, some bloggers out there who do have the insight and knowledge to know what they are talking about, but frankly, there aren’t too many. It’s sad though that our culture has dumped these ‘enthusiastic consumers’ (and this is all they essentially are) along with seasoned fashion, art or critics of any other discipline, when really, all these enthusiasts are are merely cheerleaders, focusing on today rather than tomorrow, barely noticing the bigger picture, which is actually way more interesting than yakking on about some bag, dress or shoe. The Cathy Horyns and Robin Givhans of fashion are even MORE important than ever in this climate…but yes, they do seem to be an endangered species.

    Eddi Frantz from Australia