default-output-block.skip-main
BoF Logo

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.

Adidas to Use Marine Plastic Waste in Products From 2016

German sportswear firm Adidas is trying to clean up the world's oceans with a plan to develop materials made from marine plastic waste that can be used in its products.
By
  • Reuters

HERZOGENAURACH, Germany — German sportswear firm Adidas is teaming up with a group trying to clean up the world's oceans with a plan to develop materials made from marine plastic waste that can be used in its products.

As the result of its partnership with the Parley for the Oceans initiative, Adidas also said on Monday it would phase out the use of plastic bags at its 2,900 stores.

Big fashion brands are jostling to highlight their ethical credentials as protest groups like Greenpeace pressure them to cut their environmental impact and improve factory conditions.

Swedish retailer H&M for instance has pledged to triple the amount of products made of recycled fibres by the end of 2015.

Plastic used in the consumer goods industry causes marine pollution with a "natural capital cost", a measure of environmental damage, of at least $13 billion a year, according to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

Parley, a group of artists, designers, musicians and scientists, says much of the plastic waste ends up in mid-ocean whirlpools, entangling whales, birds and turtles and damaging the internal organs of the fish that ingest it.

Adidas said it would work with Parley to develop fibres made from recycled ocean waste for use in its clothing, and potentially shoe uppers, from next year. Dutch retailer G-Star Raw worked with Parley last year to launch a denim line made out of plastic waste.

Adidas made the announcement as it released its annual sustainability report, which detailed other steps the company is taking to improve its environmental record, such as using more sustainably-farmed cotton and recycled polyester.

By Emma Thomasson; editor: David Holmes.

In This Article

© 2021 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.
CONNECT WITH US ON
The State of Fashion: Technology
© 2022 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions and Privacy policy.
The State of Fashion: Technology