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Britain’s JD Sports to Buy France’s Courir in $572 Million Deal

JD Sports store.
JD said it was not expected to complete the deal before the second half of 2023. (Shutterstock)

The retailer has proposed buying France’s Groupe Courir for an enterprise value of €520 million ($572 million), in what would be the British group’s first acquisition since setting out ambitious expansion plans in February.

JD currently trades from over 3,400 stores across 32 territories, including Britain, France, Germany, the United States and Australia.

Courir, which has 313 stores across six countries in Europe, including France, Spain and Belgium, is currently majority owned by Equistone Partners Europe which acquired it in 2018.

JD Sports said on Tuesday that in accordance with French law Courir’s management will start a consultation process with its employee representative bodies before a binding sale and purchase agreement can be reached.

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Given the deal also requires the approval of the European Commission, JD said it was not expected to complete before the second half of 2023.

It said it would pay €325 million for Courir, funded through existing cash resources, and take on debt of €195 million.

In 2022, Courir made a profit of €47.4 million on revenue of €609.8 million.

In February, JD said it would spend up to £3 billion to open as many as 1,750 stores over five years, as CEO Régis Schultz outlined his plans for the retailer to become an athletic leisurewear “powerhouse”.

The group also said on Tuesday it had completed the purchase of the remaining 20 percent of JD Sports Fashion Germany.

It is also in talks with the minority shareholders of Iberian Sports Retail Group over its future ownership.

Shares in JD were up 2.8 percent in early trading, extending its gains this year to 33 percent.

By Eva Mathews and James Davey; Edited by Sarah Young and Sonali Paul

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