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Revolve’s Sales, Costs Rose in Q2

Rapper Saweetie standing in front of Revolve backdrop during Coachella in 2019.
Rapper Saweetie at Revolve Festival during Coachella in 2019. (Getty)

The Los Angeles-based e-commerce fashion retailer posted a 27 percent year-over-year increase in net sales — $290 million — in the three months ending on June 30, it reported Wednesday.

However, its net income, a measure of profitability, dropped significantly in the quarter, from $35.5 million last year to $16.3 million, due to rising costs of shipping and a much higher rate of returns.

Fuel surcharges in particular contributed to the margin hit, according to co-founder and co-chief executive Mike Karanikolas. The surcharges were quadruple that of the same period in 2021, though Karanikolas said he anticipates these costs to drop.

The company’s shares fell 14 percent.

”We delivered these results despite macroeconomic conditions that became more challenging as the quarter progressed, creating cost pressures that impacted profitability, and also contributed to a moderating year-over-year growth trend in net sales in June that has continued into the third quarter,” Karanikolas said in a statement.

Revolve expects the coming months to be challenging in terms of macroeconomic conditions, with its fourth quarter likely to be the most difficult, CFO Jesse Timmermans said on a call with analysts.

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