Skip to main content
BoF Logo

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.

$30 Million Worth of US Fashion Imports Stopped for Forced Labour Inspections in Last Year

A total of 631 apparel, footwear and textile shipments with a combined value of $29.55 million have been stopped under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) since it came into effect in June 2022.
Shipping containers boat
Containers on a cargo ship. (Getty Images.)

A total of 631 apparel, footwear and textile shipments with a combined value of $29.55 million have been stopped under the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) since it came into effect in June 2022, according to statistics published Tuesday by US Customs and Border Protection.

Over one-third (261) of these shipments were denied entry following examination by US Customs, while 136 were cleared for entry and a further 234 are still pending. The vast majority of imports came from China (345) and Vietnam (263).

After electronics, the apparel, footwear and textiles industry was the second-most impacted by UFLPA enforcement, but had by far the highest number of shipments denied entry, the statistics show.

The UFLPA was an unprecedented regulatory move to strengthen authorities’ powers to seize goods they believe could be linked to forced labour in China and put a greater onus on businesses to prove their supply chains are free from such abuses. It followed previous crackdowns on US imports of cotton and tomato products linked to the Chinese region of Xinjiang, where according to widespread reports in recent years, Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic minorities have been subjected to human rights abuses including forced labour at the hands of the Chinese government, though Beijing denies the allegations.

ADVERTISEMENT

Learn more:

Where Does Your T-Shirt Really Come From?

A stringent US ban on imports from China’s Xinjiang region ratchets up the pressure on companies to prove their supply chains are free of forced labour.

In This Article

© 2024 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions

More from Sustainability
How fashion can do better for people and the planet.

Op-Ed | Circular Fashion Needs Government Incentives

Textile-to-textile recycling technologies could be a climate game changer for fashion’s environmental footprint. But like renewable energy, they need state support for market efforts to scale, argues Nicole Rycroft.


Fashion’s Supply Chain Is Still Full of Banned Chinese Cotton

A study published this week found traces of cotton from Xinjiang in nearly a fifth of the products it examined, highlighting the challenges brands face in policing their supply chains even as requirements to do so spread to raw materials from diamonds to leather and palm oil.


view more

Subscribe to the BoF Daily Digest

The essential daily round-up of fashion news, analysis, and breaking news alerts.

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.
CONNECT WITH US ON
The Business of Beauty Global Forum
© 2024 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy, Cookie Policy and Accessibility Statement.
The Business of Beauty Global Forum