default-output-block.skip-main
BoF Logo

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.

Hugo Boss Expects Demand for Suits to Return Despite Quarterly Sales Slump

The German luxury house saw its sales drop 59 percent and reported revenue of $323.5 million in the second quarter, missing analyst expectations.
Hugo Boss clothes | Source: Shutterstock
By
  • Reuters

METZINGEN, Germany — German fashion house Hugo Boss expects demand for suits and formal wear to return as coronavirus lockdowns ease even as it adjusts to the rising popularity of casual styles after sales tumbled 59 percent in the second quarter.

"People will still get married and hold confirmations or baptisms and people still want to meet up," acting Chief Executive Yves Mueller told journalists, adding he saw pent-up demand for formal outfits for events postponed by lockdowns.

Hugo Boss reported quarterly revenue of €275 million ($323.5 million), missing an average analyst forecast for €288 million, while its operating loss of €124 million was ahead of consensus for a loss of €133 million.

Shares in the company, down 47 percent this year, were up 1.7 percent at 08.12 am GMT.

The company known for its smart men's suits already makes more than half of its sales from sports wear or casual styles, Mueller said, adding that customers were also increasingly mixing and matching casual and formal garments.

In the second quarter, products like T-shirts, polo shirts, trousers and lounge wear proved more resilient than formal wear.

"We are convinced that ready-to-wear will come back after the pandemic," he said, shrugging off predictions that many people will keep working from home even after the pandemic.

Mueller is holding the fort after Mark Langer stepped down as chief executive. Daniel Grieder, the former chief executive of Tommy Hilfiger Global & PVH Europe, is due to take over next June.

Sales rose 4 percent in the quarter in mainland China, including double-digit growth in June, a similar trend to that reported by LVMH, the world's biggest luxury goods group, which said last week that momentum had especially improved in China.

By contrast sales fell 59 percent in Europe and 82 percent in the Americas, with unrest and demonstrations in the United States in May and June putting more strain on its business.

The company expects a gradual improvement for the second half of 2020, but declined to provide a full-year forecast.

Men's Wearhouse owner Tailored Brands filed for bankruptcy on Sunday, after it was hit by the collapse in demand for office attire.

By Emma Thomasson; editor: Edward Taylor and David Holmes

© 2021 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions

The Business of Fashion

Agenda-setting intelligence, analysis and advice for the global fashion community.
CONNECT WITH US ON
The BoF Sustainability Masterclass Series
© 2022 The Business of Fashion. All rights reserved. For more information read our Terms & Conditions and Privacy policy.
The BoF Sustainability Masterclass Series